Sunningdale Agreement Notes

The 1998 Good Friday Agreement (GFA), on which Northern Ireland`s current system of devolution is based, is very similar to the Sunningdale Agreement. [5] Irish politician Séamus Mallon, who was involved in the negotiations, described the deal as a „Sunningdale for slow learners.“ This claim has been criticized by political scientists such as Richard Wilford and Stefan Wolff. The first said that „he. significant differences between them [Sunningdale and Belfast], both as regards the content and circumstances of their negotiations, implementation and operation`. [6] An agreement was reached on 21 November on a voluntary coalition of pro-agreement parties (contrary to the provisions of the Belfast Agreement, which defines the d`Hondt method for electing ministers in proportion to the main parties in the Assembly). In March 1974, pro-agreement unionists withdrew their support for the agreement and asked the Republic of Ireland to first delete Articles 2 and 3 of its Constitution (these articles would only be revised in the 1998 Good Friday Agreement). On Monday 8 April 1974, Merlyn Rees, then Sate`s secretary for Northern Ireland, held a meeting with representatives of the Ulster Workers` Council (UWC). . .

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